Resource

Sidewalks

Sidewalk Replacement Program

The City has been divided into ten sidewalk districts. One sidewalk district is inspected each year in order to determine if any portion of the sidewalk is in need of replacement. This inspection takes place in the fall prior to each district’s year. If, after inspection, it is determined that an abutting property owner’s sidewalk is in need of replacement, the homeowner will be notified accordingly.

Proposed Sidewalk Replacement Schedule, 2014-2019
*Source: 2014-2019 Capital Improvement Plan

Location

The pool is located at 14300 Oak Park Blvd, just three miles from Ferndale's city center.


Hours

The Oak Park Pool is open from mid June through late August—this year, Saturday, June 15, through Saturday, August 24.

Public open swim:

  • Monday 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Wednesday 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Thursday 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Friday 1 to 8 p.m.
  • Saturday 1 to 6 p.m.
  • Sunday 1 to 6 p.m.

Note: the City of Oak Park Recreation Department reserves the right to close the pool due to inclement weather or other circumstances.

2019 Rates
Ferndale citizens receive the resident rate

Resident Open Swim Daily Fee

  • Ages 3 and Under: Free
  • Ages 4–54: $3
  • Ages 55+: $2

Non-Residents

  • Ages 3 and Under: Free
  • Ages 4–54: $5
  • Ages 55+: $4

Season Passes (Available at Pool Entrance)

Residents

  • Ages 4–54: $30
  • Ages 55+: $20

Non-Residents

  • Ages 4–54: $50
  • Ages 55+: $40

Water Safety Information

The City of Ferndale performs regular water sampling and testing in accordance with the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act, and we continue to surpass water quality standards as mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ). The City provides comprehensive information about lead, chemicals, and other contaminants. For more information, see below.

Lead and Your Public Drinking Water

Surpasses EPA water quality standards, per GLWA testing

The Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) oversees mandatory annual testing of each of their community water suppliers. Most recent testing, courtesy of the 2018 Consumers Annual Water Quality Report, shows levels that once again exceed regulation requirements and standards. To learn more about lead testing and water safety, view Lead and Your Water Supply: An Informational Guide.

PFAS and Your Public Drinking Water

Not detected in any water supply, per GLWA testing

The Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) oversees mandatory testing of their water supply to ensure that PFAS, or chemical perfluoroalkyl substances, are not present in community drinking water supplies. Most recent testing of water in five sources (Detroit-based Water Works Park, Springwells, and Northeast water treatment plants, Allen Park-based Southwest Water Treatment Plant, and Lake Huron), performed 2222, confirmed that PFAS was not detected at any level/in any water source. You can view the report for more information.

PFAS Report: Southeast Ferndale

February 2019: The City of Ferndale learned from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (now EGLE) of the discovery of PFAS at the privately owned business property located at 1221 Farrow Street, Ferndale, identified as MacDermid, Inc.—a small chemical manufacturing and warehouse facility. Monitoring occurred at the bases of two former waste lagoons, and contamination appears limited to a small, perched zone of groundwater. The designation of this groundwater prevents it from being used as a drinking water source, and stormwater runoff from the contaminated area is captured and treated before discharge to the GLWA. Because this is a reportedly contained issue on private property, EGLE is working directly with the business/property owner(s) to excavate and re-sample. MDEQ recommended no community outreach at this time; the City has elected to publish this information in an effort to maintain transparency and information.

For more information, view the MDEQ report or contact the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.

FAQs

Can I repair my own sidewalk?

After the hearing, homeowners can choose to replace the sidewalk on their own, or have it replaced by the Contractor performing the City’s Sidewalk Replacement Program.  For further questions, contact the Department of Public Works at 248-546-2519.

How are homeowners billed for the sidewalk replacement?

The final homeowner assessments of sidewalk construction will be mailed after all construction is completed.  After the City Council approves the final assessment, it will be billed on the homeowner’s winter tax.  

What do the letter markings (A,B,C...) on the sidewalks mean?

The inspector will mark defective sidewalk flags with a letter (A, B, C, ...) indicating at least one reason why they require replacement.  The following indicates the defect associated with the letter:

A – Stubber

Stubber

B – Cracked

Cracks

C- Sunken

D- Holes or Pitted

E – Scaling

Scaling

H – Slope

O – Other (Mortar adhered to sidewalk causing a trip hazard, foot or bike prints in the sidewalk, asphalt    patch in sidewalk, etc.)

When do sidewalk replacements occur?

After the hearing, homeowners can choose to replace the sidewalk on their own, or have it replaced by the Contractor performing the City’s Sidewalk Replacement Program.  

Who will make the sidewalk repairs?

After inspections have been completed, the Sidewalk Replacement Program is publicly bid, and a Public Hearing for necessity of repairs is scheduled. Notification letters are mailed to affected homeowners with the time, date and location of the Public Hearing. The letters also include an estimated quantity and cost of the sidewalk to be replaced

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